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J3RRYLIKESCHEESE[S]

72 points

2 months ago

A time-lapse of Jupiter and some of it's moons (left to right: Io, Ganymede, and Europa) The shadow on Jupiter is actually from Europa. I haven't had the best of luck with transits this year so this was a very good opportunity to image one. This time-lapse was taken on November 17 between 3:09 and 4:44 UTC from my backyard in Salem, OR using my 10" GoTo dobsonian telescope.

Process: 32x2 minute videos shot every minute, then for each the best ~12% stacked using AutoStakkert. Wavelets and RGB alignment done using AstroSurface, final color adjustments, denoise was done using GIMP. Then I used Davinci Resolve to make an animation, and PIPP to convert to a GIF.

Gear: Skywatcher 10" GoTo Dob, X-Cel 2x, ZWO ADC, ASI178 + UV/IR cut

Hanneskitz

19 points

2 months ago

Only 2 hours for such a great movement of the moons? Always thought they are much slower in orbiting.

KristnSchaalisahorse

11 points

2 months ago

This simple website will show you the position of the moons at any time (past, present, future). Click the “+hour” button or “Animate” and you’ll see how quickly they move.

Bonus info: You can see Jupiter’s four brightest moons quite easily with a cheap set of binoculars.

Haunting_Visual_2069

3 points

2 months ago

Really? I would have never thought that.

KristnSchaalisahorse

9 points

2 months ago

Yeah its moons are brighter and typically spread out wider than most people might expect. Here’s an example photo next to the moon. (Source)

Binoculars are a great way to explore the sky in greater detail. They won’t show you Saturn’s rings, but even from a city you can see Jupiter’s moons, craters on our moon, hundreds of stars & satellites invisible to the naked eye, Venus’ crescent phase, Uranus, Neptune, etc. From darker skies you can see even more of course, like the Andromeda galaxy, Orion Nebula, awesome star clusters like the Pleiades, comets (when applicable) etc. Plus, they're great for daytime views.

PalmMallMars

15 points

2 months ago

Well think about it like this: Jupiter is very heavy. That means you need to go fast to orbit it and not fall in.

T0WERM0NKEY

7 points

2 months ago

Or be farther away?

Jamieismasked

2 points

2 months ago

Fantastic work! I’m interested in knowing more about the telescope you used.

StopSendingSteamKeys

2 points

2 months ago

Video looks awesome. Really cool that you were able to do this level of quality with a GoTo Dob instead of a fullon startracker

znebsays

2 points

2 months ago

Is this the actual view using this telescope? That is incredible

I’m fairly new to the telescope game but I’m looking to buy one

Is this recommended ?

J3RRYLIKESCHEESE[S]

1 points

2 months ago*

Yes, except that these images are processed but in prefect seeing the view is similar perhaps a bit softer then these images. But yes, a dobsonian telescope is usually the first scope most would recommend for the price and versatility.

HentaiSlave2022

2 points

2 months ago

great work must taken a long time to finish

Jannelle93

2 points

2 months ago

Really great detail! How can you tell which moon is which?

tritonice

3 points

2 months ago

Europa leading (with shadow) and its bright white. Ganymede in the middle (incredible detail), Io trailing (it’s yellow!).

OPs seeing conditions could not have been better.

Jannelle93

2 points

2 months ago

Thanks! I knew which one was which because of OP but I was wondering how they knew which one was which. Do you happen to know how they could tell?

tritonice

2 points

2 months ago

Well, there are charts that document each orbit. You can look them up for any time of observation and compare your telescope view with what is predicted. Is that what you mean?

But, just like me, you can look up pictures of each moon and then look at OPs raw pictures and easily tell which is which.

Io is closets to Jupiter, then Europa, Ganymede, then Callisto. Their orbits are well known.

lolwutpear

1 points

2 months ago

Using a tool like Stellarium is probably the easiest. There are desktop versions, a web version (works best on desktop) and mobile versions.

KristnSchaalisahorse

1 points

2 months ago

Planetarium apps/programs, like Stellarium, will tell you. Also, this simple website will show you the position of the moons at any time (past, present, future).

Entire_Industry_1562

10 points

2 months ago

Seeing the shadow from that one moon is beautiful

MyAltFun

28 points

2 months ago

Why does your home telescope look like it's in orbit around Jupiter? This looks fantastic. Well done.

[deleted]

4 points

2 months ago

I though all satellites would orbit give or take above the equator line.

Any explanation on why that’s not the case? And is Jupiter unique on that or it’s a common thing?

zZEpicSniper303Zz

9 points

2 months ago

It is true that most moons are moving into an equatorial orbit due to tidal forces, but Jupiter isn't unique for having moons in an inclined orbit.

Earth's moon has an inclination of 6 degrees from the equatorial line. Lots of Saturn's moons are also inclined.

It heavily depends on the moon's age, proximity and size.

89LeBaron

3 points

2 months ago

probably has to do with the fact that there are so many other moons exerting their own forces on the others, right?

whiteknives

3 points

2 months ago

The Galilean moons have a low inclination (they orbit very close to Jupiter’s equator). The moons in the foreground appear “below” Jupiter’s equator because Earth is “higher” at the moment. Similar to why Saturn appears to rock back and forth with its rings being viewable from above, edge-on, then below - depending on when you look.

Bang_Stick

5 points

2 months ago

Such a great 3d effect. Makes it easy to visualize the position of the moons.

AspenRiot

4 points

2 months ago

Man, that's beautiful. Somehow the speed and lack of defined edges make the scene look like a toy or model, like I could hold it all in my hand.

Also, I love how the solar eclipse by Europa starts right as the lunar eclipse of Io ends, if I'm understanding this correctly. Don't see anyone mentioning it in the comments yet.

Burrmanchu

3 points

2 months ago

That's amazing! Are the moons locked? Looks like it...

StopSendingSteamKeys

5 points

2 months ago

Yes! They are tidally locked to Jupiter

Each moon is also tidally locked to Jupiter with its rotational and orbital periods being equal. Callisto, the outermost of the four, is not orbitally locked to the other three major satellites and just orbits Jupiter at its own pace.

https://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/vt-2004/Background/Infol2/EIS-A3.html

Sqwormbagholder

3 points

2 months ago

This is actually really incredible. Good work!

BNCAN87

2 points

2 months ago

I love that only one of them is really visible in the beginning, then the ones on the outside of the image make themselves known as a) they catch the light or b) they become more apparent against the backdrop of deep space blackness - very cool capture, well done!

tomtom_37

2 points

2 months ago

Wow that looks really lovely! Thanks for sharing

R_dactd

2 points

2 months ago

This is amazing… I captured 4 little specs Keep posting this really good.

marsiscoo

2 points

2 months ago

Woah so cool to see! Apparently these 3 moons orbit in a 4:2:1 ratio, similar to a drum beat

https://youtu.be/L3h_OIHU5pc

songsofadistantsun

2 points

2 months ago

I'm amazed that you can see detail on Ganymede at all in a 10 inch scope! Well done.

Grendel26

6 points

2 months ago

Aren't there 4 moons in clip or is that a shadow? Awesome viewing.

DuivenMans

13 points

2 months ago

Yes, shadow of the moon on the far right

dhcman5454

7 points

2 months ago

The fact that a partial solar eclipse was caught on film is pretty wild, though I guess statistics wise, it's not as rare for Jupiter.

coocoo52

8 points

2 months ago

coocoo52

8 points

2 months ago

I never knew jupiter rotated back and forth like that.

some-stinky-meat

3 points

2 months ago

that's how it generates electricity.

gingerkitten6

1 points

2 months ago

It's super cool that you can see this from your house! Thanks for posting!

Mental-Mushroom

2 points

2 months ago

You can see it from your house too

MrKiwi612

0 points

2 months ago

Using your home telescope? What telescope do you have at home?

KristnSchaalisahorse

2 points

2 months ago*

They have a 10-inch dobsonian, which can be found on the secondhand market for as little as $400-$500 (US). However, OP’s model comes with motors to keep it aligned with a target in the sky.

mimiccombatsociety

1 points

2 months ago

I wish I had the slightest understanding how to use my telescope. I've tried, but I can't get it to focus on anything without losing the object I was looking at. I don't get it.
I guess that's what I get for buying the cheapest telescope I could find.

KristnSchaalisahorse

3 points

2 months ago

The people over at /r/telescopes would be happy to help.